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Lead-Based Paint Management

Renovation, Repair & Painting

Common renovation activities can create hazardous lead dust and chips by disturbing lead-based paint, which can be harmful to adults and children.

Since January 1, 2010, under the North Carolina Rules 10A NCAC 41C .0900 - Lead-Based Paint Hazard Management Program for Renovation, Repair and Painting (PDF, 42KB), dust sampling technicians, firms, and individuals performing renovation, repair and painting projects for compensation that disturb lead-based paint in housing and child-occupied facilities built before 1978, must be certified and must follow specific work practices to prevent lead contamination. Child-occupied facilities include, but are not limited to, child care facilities and schools with children under the age of 6 years of age that are built before 1978.

To get more information on the specific work practices and other actions required by reference in the North Carolina Rules, see 40 CFR Part 745, Subpart L - Lead-Based Paint Activities and 40 CFR Part 745, Subpart E – Residential Property Renovation. The latest changes to the Renovation, Repair and Painting Rules are available in the Federal Register / Vol.76, No.151 / August 5, 2011 (PDF, 284KB). N.C. contractors performing applicable renovations have had to comply with these rule changes since October 4, 2011.

Requirements for Contractors

Contractors play an important role in helping to prevent lead exposure. Ordinary renovation and maintenance activities can create dust that contains lead. By following lead-safe work practices, you can prevent lead hazards.

The RRP program mandates that contractors, property managers and others working for compensation in homes and child-occupied facilities built before 1978 must be trained in and use lead-safe work practices. They are also required to provide the lead pamphlet, The Lead-Safe Certified Guide to Renovate Right (PDF, 6.2MB), Guía De Prácticas Acreditadas Seguras Para Trabajar Con El Plomo Para Remodelar Correctamente (Spanish PDF, 4.7KB), to owners and occupants before starting renovation work.

Since January 1, 2010, North Carolina has required contractors and firms to be certified and to use lead-safe work practices. Read about how to comply by viewing the North Carolina Rules 10A NCAC 41C .0900 - Lead-Based Paint Hazard Management Program for Renovation, Repair and Painting (PDF, 42KB) and the associated 40 CFR Part 745, Subpart L - Lead-Based Paint Activities and 40 CFR Part 745, Subpart E – Residential Property Renovation. The latest changes to the Renovation, Repair and Painting Rules are available in the Federal Register / Vol.76, No.151 / August 5, 2011 (PDF, 284KB). N.C. contractors performing applicable renovations have had to comply with these rule changes since October 4, 2011.

Requirements for Property Owners

The RRP program mandates that contractors, property managers and others working for compensation in homes and child-occupied facilities built before 1978 must be trained and use lead-safe work practices. They are also required to provide the lead pamphlet, The Lead-Safe Certified Guide to Renovate Right (PDF, 6.2MB), Guía De Prácticas Acreditadas Seguras Para Trabajar Con El Plomo Para Remodelar Correctamente (Spanish PDF, 4.7KB), to owners and occupants before starting renovation work.

Property owners have the ultimate responsibility for the safety of their family, tenants, or children in their care. To learn more about lead-safe work practices and actions you can take before beginning work, read EPA's lead hazard information pamphlet, The Lead-Safe Certified Guide to Renovate Right (PDF, 6.2MB), Guía De Prácticas Acreditadas Seguras Para Trabajar Con El Plomo Para Remodelar Correctamente (Spanish PDF, 4.7KB).

Requirements for Tenants and Families of Children Under Age 6 in Child-Occupied Facilities

Firms performing renovations must provide a copy of EPA's lead hazard information pamphlet, The Lead-Safe Certified Guide to Renovate Right (PDF, 6.2MB), Guía De Prácticas Acreditadas Seguras Para Trabajar Con El Plomo Para Remodelar Correctamente (Spanish PDF, 4.7KB), to homeowners, tenants, and administrators of pre-1978 child care facilities and schools that will be renovated. Renovation information must also be available to the parents or guardians of children under age six that attend child care facilities and schools.

To find certified professionals for abatement or renovation activities, search our database of North Carolina certified lead professionals.

Additional Guidance