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Facts & Figures

Annual Reports

The annual North Carolina HIV/STD/Hepatitis Surveillance Report contains detailed case statistics and tables about syphilis, gonorrhea, chlamydia, HIV/AIDS, viral hepatitis B and C for the last full 5-year period. It includes breakdowns of reports by sex, age group, and race/ethnicity for each year with accompanying disease incidence rates.

Note: Since 2014, all charts are based on the date of disease diagnosis (prior to 2014, some charts had been based on date of report to public health).

Most Recent Annual Report

Special Note: 2016 HIV/STD/Hepatitis annual data are now available. This report has many new features: A sociodemographic section at the beginning of this report gives an overview and rates of disease by population, geography, household income, and poverty; county and state data for acute Hepatitis B and acute Hepatitis C (Tables 13, 14, 52, and 53) and statewide perinatal Hepatitis B counts (Table 31) are now included; estimated HIV diagnosis rates separated for men reporting sex with men and heterosexual men and women are in Tables 36-41; HIV prevalence tables (Tables 2, 15-26, and 32) are now based on a person’s most recent address instead of the address at the time of diagnosis; and finally, Table C shows rates by census tract. Charts, figures, and data on various populations are available as Fact Sheets and Slide Sets; some 2016 data is now available in these formats. Fact sheets and slide sets are updated over the course of the year.

Please Note that we recently changed our data release policy and are now releasing case counts that are under the 5 if the population denominator is more than 500.

Key Points from 2016 North Carolina HIV/STD Surveillance Report:

  • As of December 31, 2016, the number of people diagnosed with HIV who reside in North Carolina (including those initially diagnosed in another state) was 34,187.
  • In 2016, 1,399 new diagnoses of HIV were reported among the adult and adolescent (over 13 years old) population, at a rate of 16.4 per 100,000 population. This is a slight increase from 2015, where 1,334 persons were newly diagnosed with HIV, at a rate of 15.9 per 100,000 population. 
  • There were two infants with perinatal (mother-to-child) transmission of HIV in 2016.
  • The number of early syphilis (primary, secondary, and early latent) cases diagnosed in North Carolina in 2016 was 1,894, with a rate of 18.7 per 100,000 population. This number is similar to the cases in 2015, when 1,881 early syphilis cases were diagnosed (18.7 per 100,000 population). 
    • A total of 16 infants were reported with probable congenital syphilis and two confirmed/stillbirths, for a total of 18 congenital syphilis cases in 2016. This is an increase, from the 11 probable congenital syphilis cases reported in 2015. 
  • The reported number of gonorrhea cases in 2016 was 19,724 at a rate of 194.4 per 100,000 population, an increase from 17,049 cases in 2015 (rate of 169.9 per 100,000 population). Among women reported with gonorrhea, the highest rates occurred in 20 to 24-year-olds, followed by 15 to 19-year-olds (1,017.5 and 708.5 per 100,000 population, respectively). The 15 to 29-year-olds comprised 39.2% of the total reported gonorrhea cases in 2016. 
  • The number of chlamydia cases diagnosed in North Carolina in 2016 was 58,078 at a rate of 572.4 per 100,000 population, compared to 54,384 cases in 2015 (rate of 541.9 per 100,000 population). Among women reported with chlamydia, the highest rates occurred in 20 to 24-year-olds, followed by 15 to 19-year-olds (4,832.6 and 3,901.6 per 100,000 population, respectively).
  • The number of acute hepatitis B cases diagnosed in North Carolina in 2016 was 151 at a rate of 1.5 per 100,000 population, compared to 140 cases in 2015 (1.4 per 100,000 population). The highest rates of newly diagnosed acute hepatitis B occurred among the 35 to 44-year-old age group. This age group comprised 33.8% of the total acute hepatitis B cases.
  • The number of acute hepatitis C cases diagnosed in North Carolina in 2016 was 185 at a rate of 1.8 per 100,000 population, compared to 116 cases in 2015 (1.2 per 100,000 population).  The highest rates of newly diagnosed acute hepatitis C occurred among the 20 to 39-year-old age group. This age group comprised 67.6% of the total acute hepatitis C cases.

Previous Annual Reports (Last Four Years*)

  • 2015 (PDF, 3 MB) - Revised: 10/11/2016
  • 2014 (PDF, 5 MB)
  • 2013 (PDF, 1.6 MB)
  • 2012 (PDF, 3 MB)

*See Archives for earlier versions of the Annual Reports.